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Tips On Flying
August 19th, 2016
by Bill Boyajian

40130356 - businessman at airport with suitcase

I’ve logged a lot of miles over the decades and learned a lot about flying commercial, sometimes the hard way.  Airline travel is more difficult today than in years past, and it also gets tougher as we get older.  But here are some important tips to remember when you next plan airline travel:

  • When heading to the airport, give yourself an extra 20 minutes more than your most realistic time estimate.  Extra sleep is over-rated and the hassle of missing a flight is under-rated.
  • Take the first flight out in the morning.  In most every case, the plane is already on the ground and ready to go.  You won’t have to wait (or hope) for your plane to arrive.
  • Don’t take the last flight out unless you have to.  That flight is often delayed and if there’s a “mechanical” problem, you’ll be over-nighting in that city.
  • Always take a direct flight, if possible.  This will obviously save you time and you have much less chance of losing your luggage, if you had to check it.
  • But don’t check your bag if you don’t have to.  If I have to explain why, you probably shouldn’t be flying.
  • If you’re flying coach, always ask for a seat in an exit row.  The extra space will make for a much more comfortable flight.
  • A bulkhead seat is also a great choice for extra leg room.  Just know that you won’t have any storage in front of you because there is no seat in front of you!
  • Always carry head phones.  These will allow you to “escape” from “talkative Terry,” who may be sitting right next to you.  Blame it on work that you really must get done!
  • If your flight is cancelled, don’t stand in a long line waiting to be re-routed.  Instead, call the airline immediately and have them book you on the next flight out or re-route you with other options.  Be nice, but be persistent.
  • Avoid large international airports if you can.  A smaller, regional airport is easier to navigate, and there is less chance of baggage loss.
  • For international flights, one flight is better than two, and two flights are always better than three.  And keep a photocopy of your passport with you, just in case.
  • On long flights, drink plenty of clear fluids to avoid dehydration.  When you get up (and you’ll have to!), take time to stretch your muscles and move freely around the cabin.
  • Leave your shoes on.  Your feet will definitely swell if you take your shoes off.  I’m reminded of the guy in business class who took the flight attendant to task for his shoes “shrinking.”  It took her a while to convince him otherwise.  Keeping your shoes on will also make the people sitting around you much happier.

So there you have it.  Travel tips for flying.  Travel safely, but travel smart!



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Top of Mind: August 11, 2016
August 11th, 2016
by Bill Boyajian

Co-Worker Turmoil                                                                                                                                           

I received so many comments on a recent message on Human Capital – as well as a suggestion or two – that I thought I’d follow it up with an often neglected, but very important aspect of teamwork: turmoil amongst co-workers.

44118216 - screaming people

Most owners and managers don’t realize how much unproductive time is wasted with the bickering of employees. One co-worker doesn’t get along with another, so he avoids the other at all cost. Of course that occurs after verbal attacks have been inflicted against each person. A failure to communicate properly, or worse, building cliques within a department or company, causes alienation, frustration, anger, and often downright animosity within the group.

It’s true. Some people just push others’ buttons. But the negative energy generated from the angst of one associate against another is enough to justify some serious inquiry and resolution. Too often, leaders simply avoid these situations, hoping they will somehow resolve on their own. They seldom do, so take the time necessary to intervene. If the situation persists after serious intervention, you’ll have to take stronger action, up to and including termination.

 

Here are a few Business & Life Tips to think about….

Business Tips:

  • Practice the art of inclusion. Informed associates are happier because they feel part of the team. Loyalty results from good leadership.
  • Small businesses are like families, where people need to know and understand everyone’s personality and temperament to get along.
  • People in the wrong position will struggle. People in the right position will thrive. Finding your right “fit” is vital.

 

Life Tips:

  • When you lack patience, try to slow everything down. Slowing things down tends to take the edge off, and allows you time to reflect.
  • People who push your buttons and create negative energy aren’t worth the aggravation. Ignore them, avoid them, or fire them.
  • We sometimes get so focused on the direction we have set that we forget about the objective. Take some time to reflect on the goal.

 

Coach’s Note

People ask me what my “Program” is for consulting. I don’t have a “Program.” I come to a store or company and do “business discovery.” I identify the strengths and weaknesses of each business and we leverage the strengths and strengthen the weaknesses. Every store or business is different because every owner or manager is different. We attack each issue with persistence. Most issues involve people and the company’s leadership and overall management. If you can use some help, contact me for a free consultation.



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Co-Worker Turmoil
August 9th, 2016
by Bill Boyajian

I received so many comments on a recent message on Human Capital – as well as a suggestion or two – that I thought I’d follow it up with an often neglected, but very important aspect of teamwork: turmoil amongst co-workers.

44118216 - screaming people

Most owners and managers don’t realize how much unproductive time is wasted with the bickering of employees.  One co-worker doesn’t get along with another, so he avoids the other at all cost.  Of course that occurs after verbal attacks have been inflicted against each person.  A failure to communicate properly, or worse, building cliques within a department or company, causes alienation, frustration, anger, and often downright animosity within the group.

It’s true.  Some people just push others’ buttons.  But the negative energy generated from the angst of one associate against another is enough to justify some serious inquiry and resolution.  Too often, leaders simply avoid these situations, hoping they will somehow resolve on their own.  They seldom do, so take the time necessary to intervene.  If the situation persists after serious intervention, you’ll have to take stronger action, up to and including termination.



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Top of Mind: July 28, 2016
July 28th, 2016
by Bill Boyajian

Life Purpose

I just read, Edmund Morgan’s biography of Benjamin Franklin, who after becoming successful in the printing/publishing business in Philadelphia devoted the second half of his life to scientific discovery and public service. The picture we all have of Franklin flying a kite during a lightning storm is balanced by what we know was his service to our fledgling country in the 18th Century.

19654910 - benjamin franklin in front of american flags.

I love what Franklin wrote to his mother in 1750, when in his early 40s: “I would rather have it said, he lived usefully, than, he died rich.” Franklin had a rare form of insatiable curiosity coupled with a devotion to that which was greater than himself, as great as he was. Not many of us can live the life that Franklin lived, but most of us can think about the type of service he provided to humankind, and how we might find even a small measure of success in giving back the way he did.

While many of us seek to find success in business, we should not fail to find success in life. A life purpose is something to give serious thought to no matter your age or stage in life. What you want to become can also be what you want to be remembered for. I’m not sure which is more important, but I think we would all like to be thought well of while we’re here, and later when we’re not.

So give some thought this week to your life purpose, and drop me a line if the idea stimulates your thinking.

 

Here are a few Business & Life Tips to think about….

Business Tips:

  • A good way to measure success in business is not just with financial performance, but with the quality of new customers you create.
  • A key to every business is to stay competitive and to make sure to utilize new technologies in adapting to consumer demand.
  • People want in their leader someone they can trust. This is the key component that develops followership and loyalty.

Life Tips:

  • The key to achieving almost anything is to know about 50% of what is necessary, and the rest is skill and sheer determination.
  • Einstein said that imagination is more important than knowledge because knowledge is in the past. Imagination holds the future.
  • When we keep things simple in life, it keeps us calm and clear in perspective and in practice. Peace and joy are the direct result.

 

Check out another recent article written by Bill in….

 The-Retail-Jeweler-Logo 

 

July – August 2016 Issue

– Scroll to Page 22 –

Succession Planning and Family Transition



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Life Purpose
July 26th, 2016
by Bill Boyajian

I just read, Edmund Morgan’s biography of Benjamin Franklin, who after becoming successful in the printing/publishing business in Philadelphia devoted the second half of his life to scientific discovery and public service.  The picture we all have of Franklin flying a kite during a lightning storm is balanced by what we know was his service to our fledgling country in the 18th Century.

19654910 - benjamin franklin in front of american flags.

I love what Franklin wrote to his mother in 1750, when in his early 40s: “I would rather have it said, he lived usefully, than, he died rich.”  Franklin had a rare form of insatiable curiosity coupled with a devotion to that which was greater than himself, as great as he was.  Not many of us can live the life that Franklin lived, but most of us can think about the type of service he provided to humankind, and how we might find even a small measure of success in giving back the way he did.

While many of us seek to find success in business, we should not fail to find success in life.  A life purpose is something to give serious thought to no matter your age or stage in life.  What you want to become can also be what you want to be remembered for.  I’m not sure which is more important, but I think we would all like to be thought well of while we’re here, and later when we’re not.

So give some thought this week to your life purpose, and drop me a line if the idea stimulates your thinking.



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Top of Mind: July 14, 2016
July 14th, 2016
by Bill Boyajian

The Truest Luxury of All: Owning Your Own Time

What is luxury?  It depends on what is important to you at each stage in life.

When I was young, luxury meant having enough disposable income to acquire nice things and to provide for my family.  As we acquire more “things” that we want (or think we need), such tangible items – which we believe will satisfy our desire for luxury – become less and less important.  As time flies and as the years grow shorter, a new luxury enters the scene: owning our own time and using it the way we please.

18162955 - couple on a tropical beach at maldives

Millennials are accused of wanting too much too soon in life, but what they really want is a more balanced life than what their parents had.  After all, they’ve been brought up with the world at their fingertips.  This has shaped their thinking and they want a balanced life even if they can’t achieve it right away.

So what do I want?  I want the luxury of owning my own time and doing what I love to do, in business and in pleasure.  And what do you want?  Would you like to own the luxury of your own time?

 
Here are a few Business & Life Tips to think about….

Business Tips:

  • Try to make money while you’re sleeping by developing business that generates income 24/7. Waking up will be more fun!
  • New wealth opportunities are almost always created by people from outside of an industry. They don’t know what can’t be done.
  • If work is something you just show up to (instead of enjoy), it’s time to look for something else. Life is too short to be miserable.

Life Tips:

  • Do what you want to do now, rather than waiting until it is too late. Life happens fast, and we wonder where all the years went.
  • Hard work and smart work are not the same thing. Hard work makes you successful, while smart work makes life balanced.
  • Stop what you’re doing and start with a clean canvas. Ask yourself: What pleases me? What brings me joy? What rocks my soul?

 
Check out a past article written by Bill in….

The-Retail-Jeweler-Logo

 

June 2016 Issue

– Scroll to Page 12 –

Performance Reviews Should Be Performance Conversations



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The Truest Luxury of All: Owning Your Own Time
July 5th, 2016
by Bill Boyajian

18162955 - couple on a tropical beach at maldives

What is luxury?  It depends on what is important to you at each stage in life.

When I was young, luxury meant having enough disposable income to acquire nice things and to provide for my family.  As we acquire more “things” that we want (or think we need), such tangible items – which we believe will satisfy our desire for luxury – become less and less important.  As time flies and as the years grow shorter, a new luxury enters the scene: owning our own time and using it the way we please.

Millennials are accused of wanting too much too soon in life, but what they really want is a more balanced life than what their parents had.  After all, they’ve been brought up with the world at their fingertips.  This has shaped their thinking and they want a balanced life even if they can’t achieve it right away.

So what do I want?  I want the luxury of owning my own time and doing what I love to do, in business and in pleasure.  And what do you want?  Would you like to own the luxury of your own time?



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Top of Mind: June 30, 2016
July 1st, 2016
by Bill Boyajian

Human Capital

Most leaders will agree that human capital is the most valuable asset that any company in any industry can have.  The amazement comes when you see how poorly people are treated in so many workplaces.

I’m not referring to the Fortune 500 companies that can afford free meals, day care, and health clubs.  I’m concerned about the hundreds of thousands of small businesses, many of which treat employees as if they were expendable commodities and then wonder why they can’t attract and retain great people.

41267128_s

Contrary to popular opinion, today’s employees aren’t all that different from the previous generation.  They want to work in a culture that values individuals and the contributions they make.  They want to work for an owner or leader who cares about them.  They want to work for a winning team but be a star in their own right.  Millennials, in particular, see their workplace as a key social network and one of their primary connections to society as a whole.

So maybe it’s time for business owners and leaders to define who they are, why their business exists, and what they are looking for in human capital.  People want to work for leaders who have it together and for businesses that are going somewhere.  If people don’t know where you’re going, or how you’re going to get there, they’re unlikely to come aboard, and less likely to stay aboard once they figure you out.

Human capital is the engine that drives business.  If you have the best people, you’ll have the best company.

 
Here are a few Business & Life Tips to think about….

Business Tips:

  • Nothing happens until a sale is made. Salespeople are worth their weight in gold when they produce great results. Nourish them.
  • If you are a leader, you need to keep people informed–good, bad, or ugly. Knowledgeable people are understanding people.
  • People want to work for a brand they can identify with and a culture they believe in. Leaders are wise to build both.

Life Tips:

  • What we do has profound meaning in the sequence of life circumstances. Most life situations result from our actions or in-actions.
  • You lose today by reaching back to yesterday. Instead, live today and seek tomorrow. Think future. The past is simply the past.
  • Change can be difficult, but nothing happens until something old transitions away. Look for opportunities in the midst of change.

 
Check out a past article written by Bill in….

The-Retail-Jeweler-Logo

 

 

July – August  2015 Issue

– Scroll to Page 56 –

Leaving a Legacy: The People Principle



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Human Capital
June 24th, 2016
by Bill Boyajian

41267128_s

Most leaders will agree that human capital is the most valuable asset that any company in any industry can have.  The amazement comes when you see how poorly people are treated in so many workplaces.

I’m not referring to the Fortune 500 companies that can afford free meals, day care, and health clubs.  I’m concerned about the hundreds of thousands of small businesses, many of which treat employees as if they were expendable commodities and then wonder why they can’t attract and retain great people.

Contrary to popular opinion, today’s employees aren’t all that different from the previous generation.  They want to work in a culture that values individuals and the contributions they make.  They want to work for an owner or leader who cares about them.  They want to work for a winning team but be a star in their own right.  Millennials, in particular, see their workplace as a key social network and one of their primary connections to society as a whole.

So maybe it’s time for business owners and leaders to define who they are, why their business exists, and what they are looking for in human capital.  People want to work for leaders who have it together and for businesses that are going somewhere.  If people don’t know where you’re going, or how you’re going to get there, they’re unlikely to come aboard, and less likely to stay aboard once they figure you out.

Human capital is the engine that drives business.  If you have the best people, you’ll have the best company.



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Top of Mind: June 16, 2016
June 16th, 2016
by Bill Boyajian

Learning to Agree to Disagree

Some people just can’t get disagreement out of their system.  They want to argue a point to death and tell everyone around them how something or somebody is wrong.  Sometimes you just want to tell them to “get over it.”

22428052_sYou can disagree with someone without being notoriously disagreeable.  You might even be right about something, but if you’re rude or indignant about it, you’re really wrong.

Instead, learn to agree to disagree and move on.  Most disagreements are more about opinion and worldview than about clear-cut “right or wrong.”  So next time you disagree with someone, know what you believe, have confidence in it, and get on with your life.  You’ll be a better, more agreeable person for it.

 
Here are a few Business & Life Tips to think about….

Business Tips:

  • Nothing happens except by, with, or through people. If you have the best people, you have the potential to be the best company.
  • Grow at a pace in business that you can handle without undue risk. Don’t tempt losing everything for anything.
  • Check references. Don’t just ask if a person did a good job. Ask about attitude, teachability, and people orientation. It all counts.

 
Life Tips:

  • If someone is being disrespectful or discourteous, and if it bothers you, tell them. Or, simply don’t complain about it.
  • Fear is a cancer that holds us back from achieving our potential. It also puts us on edge with others and affects our relationships.
  • We tell our children to make good choices, but do we? As adults, we tend to react to everything. Life is too short to choose poorly.

 
Check out a past article written by Bill in….

The-Retail-Jeweler-Logo

 

September 2015 Issue

– Scroll to Page 38 –

Weathering the Lean Years to Emerge STRONGER



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"Bill Boyajian is a leader people follow, with a proven track record of success. He will provide solutions to your biggest challenges and deliver terrific results."

–Howard Herzog
International Jewelers Block Insurance

"A sought after role model, Bill reminds us that how we lead our business has everything to do with how we live a fulfilling life."

– Pam Levine,
Levine Design Group