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The Reason a Sale is Made, or Not
June 21st, 2017
by Bill Boyajian

It’s easy to get puffed up when we make a sale, and even easier to get deflated when we lose one.  But do we really know why a sale was made, or why it was lost?  Often we don’t.

Seldom do we ask why a sale is made because we know better than to question it.  The best thing we can do is stop talking and write up the order.  But we should always review every sale to make sure we know what triggered our customer’s decision to buy.  Understanding the motive, the reasoning, and the decision-making process is a key to securing the next sale.

And when we fail to make a sale, we should always ask ourselves why.  Unless we understand the cause of the loss, we will never be able to learn from it and improve our delivery.  We need to dissect the sale process to see what went right and what went wrong.  Did we fail to sell ourself, the store, or the product?  Was the customer really ready to buy or were they just looking?  What would have pushed the person over the edge to commit to buying?

Unless we investigate both our successes and failures, we will never get better.  Often we learn more from our failures than successes, but I think we can learn a lot from both.  So take the time to review every sale.  It’s worth the effort you put into it.



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Top of Mind: June 15, 2017
June 15th, 2017
by Bill Boyajian

Memo to Millennials

I handle many family transition issues, the coaching and mentoring of family members, and succession planning for businesses. One of the things I see most often is that young people coming into a business are not there as a first choice. Sometimes they feel guilty that they should help their parents. Other times they have nowhere else to go.

Young people should work outside of their family business before they join it. Sometimes it’s too late for that, and there is little recourse but to continue on. But this often leads to problems, uncertainty about long-term commitment, and resentment about not being able to choose one’s own path in business and in life.

 
Young people deserve the right to follow their passion and to choose their own way. One of the things I recommend to Millennials is to simply write down in one column what you love to do, in another column what you are good at doing, and in a third column whether you can earn a living from either or both. We are usually quite good at what we like to do, and if we can make money doing it, we may have a formula for success.

Sometimes our work is a means to an end and simply a way to earn a living. When this is the case, we often find a hobby where we can unleash our true happiness. Sometimes people can find that joy through their hobby, and also make a nice living from it. It’s hard to do, but perhaps worth trying. If you’re a Millennial, consider this option. It will help you decide what you truly want to do.

 

 

Business Tips:

  • Courage without measured caution is a recipe for disaster. Have the common sense to listen to others and consider their advice.
  • When we are too close to a problem, we are blinded by familiarity and proximity, while others can see the issue immediately.
  • We don’t realize the power of our words until we are silenced by the words of others. Be careful about what you say to people.

 

Life Tips:

  • That uncomfortable feeling when things just aren’t right, is often caused when we get outside of our comfort zone or experience.
  • Humility is not having a low opinion of yourself, but rather, the right opinion. Humble people are comfortable in their own skin.
  • Time is your most precious asset in life. Use it to explore new horizons, discover your passion, and share great moments with friends.


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10 Ways to Know Whether People Think You’re Kind
June 8th, 2017
by Bill Boyajian

1) You know their name.
2) They call you by name.
3) You smile when you see them.
4) They smile when they see you.
5) You offer help.
6) They offer help in return.
7) They take on more responsibility even if it’s not their job to do so.
8) You ask if they want something like coffee or water, and you get it for them.
9) You listen to them.
10) They listen to you.

These aren’t all the ways you’ll know if people think you’re kind, but they provide a good start.



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Top of Mind: June 1, 2017
June 1st, 2017
by Bill Boyajian

How to Get Better 

The old adage that “practice makes perfect” needs some serious reconsideration. Practice is great if we’re practicing the right things. Unfortunately, most of us keep practicing the wrong things and wonder why things don’t get better.

So instead of “practice makes perfect,” we should think in terms of “practice makes permanent.” It’s particularly true in business. We keep doing the same things over and over again somehow believing that things will change. We wonder why business doesn’t improve, why employees don’t get along, and why we fail to make bigger sales. But we don’t analyze why these things occur, and we often do nothing to try to change the outcomes.

We also try to maintain the status quo, somehow believing that things won’t change. Things always change, but they seldom change for the better unless we take action. We want to lose weight but we don’t change our eating habits. We want to improve our golf scores, but we do little to improve our swing. We want to read more books, but can’t get started with the one at the top of our stack.

If this sounds futile, it is because we need to practice those things that make us better, not just permanent, let alone perfect. Practice won’t make us perfect at anything because perfection is an unattainable goal. But practicing the right things in business and in life will make us better. And better is what we want.

 

Here are a few Business & Life Tips to think about….

Business Tips:

  • Partners with complementary skills are great for business if their views are not so extreme as to cause more problems than they solve.
  • Your employees will emulate far more of what they see you doing than what they hear you say. If they don’t, well, enough said.
  • Customers seldom know what they want when they enter a store. Great salespeople establish rapport and tell them what they need.

  

Life Tips:

  • Believing you can succeed at whatever you’re doing is the key to succeeding at it. Have faith in yourself and just do it.
  • Mature people control their emotions through reasonable actions and reactions, rather than outbursts that take people down.
  • Most of us should try to listen more and be less defensive. Listening gives us a chance to learn about the other side of issues.


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Memo to Millennials
May 30th, 2017
by Bill Boyajian

I handle many family transition issues, the coaching and mentoring of family members, and succession planning for businesses.  One of the things I see most often is that young people coming into a business are not there as a first choice.  Sometimes they feel guilty that they should help their parents.  Other times they have nowhere else to go.

Young people should work outside of their family business before they join it.  Sometimes it’s too late for that, and there is little recourse but to continue on.  But this often leads to problems, uncertainty about long-term commitment, and resentment about not being able to choose one’s own path in business and in life.

Young people deserve the right to follow their passion and to choose their own way.  One of the things I recommend to Millennials is to simply write down in one column what you love to do, in another column what you are good at doing, and in a third column whether you can earn a living from either or both.  We are usually quite good at what we like to do, and if we can make money doing it, we may have a formula for success.

Sometimes our work is a means to an end and simply a way to earn a living.  When this is the case, we often find a hobby where we can unleash our true happiness.  Sometimes people can find that joy through their hobby, and also make a nice living from it.  It’s hard to do, but perhaps worth trying.  If you’re a Millennial, consider this option.  It will help you decide what you truly want to do.



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Top of Mind: May 18, 2017
May 23rd, 2017
by Bill Boyajian

Don’t Let Life Pass You By

Too often we major on minors.  We bury our heads in our smart phones and miss a beautiful sunset.  We overeat (or drink….) at a party, and miss a quality conversation with an interesting person.  We exercise on a machine indoors and never jog on a trail to observe nature’s wonders.  We multi-task while watching a game and miss the live action because we know we can rewind the play.  We snap at a family member or associate and fail to be gracious.  And we do all these things because we’re preoccupied with ourselves or what we’re doing instead of looking at life through a wider angle lens.

With all the focus on having an “experience” today, you would think we would slow down to enjoy some of life’s little pleasures instead of running around without any thought of what we’re missing.  Life is not a straightaway that you drive down aimlessly.  It’s more like a windy road where you slow down for the curves, not knowing what will be around the bend.

So the next time you get in too much of a hurry, stop to listen carefully to the person with an idea to share.  Take the ocean route or the mountain road instead of the freeway.  Pull over to read the historic sign or view the scenic vista.  Notice the flight of the flock in the distance and how perfectly they coordinate their turns and synchronization.  And then you’ll be enjoying life and not letting it pass you by.

 
Here are a few Business & Life Tips to think about….

Business Tips:

  • Don’t confuse working hard with working smart. Being busy doesn’t necessarily lead to the results you are looking for.
  • Many business owners look deeply into why things aren’t going well, but seldom look in the mirror to discover they are the problem.
  • As a leader, if you aren’t challenging people to be better and motivating them to peak performance, you aren’t doing your job.

Life Tips:

  • Persistence is as important as performance. Greatness is seldom achieved on the first try. Never give up on your goal. Never!
  • The past is usually filled with regret, whereas living in the present helps you create the future. The past is just that, the past.
  • When was the last time you distanced yourself from the hectic day-to-day grind just to think and reflect on life’s imponderables?

 

Here is a past article related to the message….

No Regrets



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How to Get Better
May 23rd, 2017
by Bill Boyajian

The old adage that “practice makes perfect” needs some serious reconsideration.  Practice is great if we’re practicing the right things.  Unfortunately, most of us keep practicing the wrong things and wonder why things don’t get better.

So instead of “practice makes perfect,” we should think in terms of “practice makes permanent.”  It’s particularly true in business.  We keep doing the same things over and over again somehow believing that things will change.  We wonder why business doesn’t improve, why employees don’t get along, and why we fail to make bigger sales.  But we don’t analyze why these things occur, and we often do nothing to try to change the outcomes.

We also try to maintain the status quo, somehow believing that things won’t change.  Things always change, but they seldom change for the better unless we take action.  We want to lose weight but we don’t change our eating habits.  We want to improve our golf scores, but we do little to improve our swing.  We want to read more books, but can’t get started with the one at the top of our stack.

If this sounds futile, it is because we need to practice those things that make us better, not just permanent, let alone perfect.  Practice won’t make us perfect at anything because perfection is an unattainable goal.  But practicing the right things in business and in life will make us better.  And better is what we want.



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Top of Mind: May 4, 2017
May 4th, 2017
by Bill Boyajian

Commitment

Recently I rented a car out of state, but when I got to the rental car counter at the airport, the representative told me he was out of cars. I told him I not only had a reservation as a VIP client, but that I paid for the car in advance. The representative said he was very sorry but there was nothing he could do. I then went to another rental car counter – now teeming with people – and tried to wait as patiently as I could when I saw my rep waving me back to his counter. He had (miraculously?) found a car for me. I was delighted, if not curious, but it didn’t matter. I got my car at 10pm that night, and that was all that mattered.

This experience, though disturbing, reminded me of how important our commitments are in business. Imagine your customers’ frustrations when you can’t deliver on something that was promised. Or what about when you tell your staff they’ll get a promotion or a bonus and then retract it for no apparent reason.

We need to take our commitments seriously. When we cancel things at the last minute, miss deadlines, make excuses, or fail to come through for people, we let them down and we most certainly let ourselves down. We diminish our business even more than we inconvenience or upset our customers when we can’t live up to our commitments.

So the next time you break a commitment, think about how people might eventually forgive you, but will likely not forget what you did. Then think about how that affects your integrity and your reputation.

 

Here are a few Business & Life Tips to think about….

Business Tips:

  • It’s a leader’s role to use resources in such a way as to benefit customers and ultimately benefit the business and its employees.
  • As a leader, when you can get people to appreciate their own vested interest in the business, performance will be enhanced.
  • Word of mouth referrals are the best form of advertising. They cost nothing, but provide powerful testimonials that are priceless.

 

Life Tips:

  • Truly mature people live by their commitments, not by their feelings, which can be as varied as the wind.
  • We lose the will to win when we become so overwhelmed that we no longer believe the goal we had originally is achievable.
  • One of the keys to enduring success is the ability to stay positive even during the most stressful and challenging circumstances.

 

Here is another article related to customer service….

Did You Impress Them?



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Don’t Let Life Pass You By
April 27th, 2017
by Bill Boyajian

Too often we major on minors.  We bury our heads in our smart phones and miss a beautiful sunset.  We overeat (or drink….) at a party, and miss a quality conversation with an interesting person.  We exercise on a machine indoors and never jog on a trail to observe nature’s wonders.  We multi-task while watching a game and miss the live action because we know we can rewind the play.  We snap at a family member or associate and fail to be gracious.  And we do all these things because we’re preoccupied with ourselves or what we’re doing instead of looking at life through a wider angle lens.

With all the focus on having an “experience” today, you would think we would slow down to enjoy some of life’s little pleasures instead of running around without any thought of what we’re missing.  Life is not a straightaway that you drive down aimlessly.  It’s more like a windy road where you slow down for the curves, not knowing what will be around the bend.

So the next time you get in too much of a hurry, stop to listen carefully to the person with an idea to share.  Take the ocean route or the mountain road instead of the freeway.  Pull over to read the historic sign or view the scenic vista.  Notice the flight of the flock in the distance and how perfectly they coordinate their turns and synchronization.  And then you’ll be enjoying life and not letting it pass you by.



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Commitment
April 25th, 2017
by Bill Boyajian

Recently I rented a car out of state, but when I got to the rental car counter at the airport, the representative told me he was out of cars.  I told him I not only had a reservation as a VIP client, but that I paid for the car in advance.  The representative said he was very sorry but there was nothing he could do.  I then went to another rental car counter – now teeming with people – and tried to wait as patiently as I could when I saw my rep waving me back to his counter.  He had (miraculously?) found a car for me.  I was delighted, if not curious, but it didn’t matter.  I got my car at 10pm that night, and that was all that mattered.

This experience, though disturbing, reminded me of how important our commitments are in business.  Imagine your customers’ frustrations when you can’t deliver on something that was promised.  Or what about when you tell your staff they’ll get a promotion or a bonus and then retract it for no apparent reason.

We need to take our commitments seriously.  When we cancel things at the last minute, miss deadlines, make excuses, or fail to come through for people, we let them down and we most certainly let ourselves down.  We diminish our business even more than we inconvenience or upset our customers when we can’t live up to our commitments.

So the next time you break a commitment, think about how people might eventually forgive you, but will likely not forget what you did.  Then think about how that affects your integrity and your reputation.



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"Bill Boyajian is a leader people follow, with a proven track record of success. He will provide solutions to your biggest challenges and deliver terrific results."

–Howard Herzog
International Jewelers Block Insurance

"A sought after role model, Bill reminds us that how we lead our business has everything to do with how we live a fulfilling life."

– Pam Levine,
Levine Design Group